Interview with Melody Thomas

Today I invited author Melody Thomas to tell everyone about her latest release and more.

 

Welcome.  Please tell us about your book, Passion and Pleasure in London.

The story is about two desperately lonely people who have been fighting for others for so long that they have each in their own way forgotten how to love. This is their journey on that road of self-discovery. Of course there are bumps in that road as each discovers the other is not at all what he/she seems. Each holds secrets. Rory Jameson is the dark horseman who comes riding into Winter Ashburn’s life and changes her world.

 

What inspired the story?

I have to say the first two books in the Charmed and Dangerous series inspired the story. Rory Jameson was first introduced in Wild and Wicked in Scotland, and when he made a bigger appearance in Sin and Scandal in England and kept taking over every scene he was in, I realized this dark and dangerous man was a future hero with a story inside him to tell. I also love the lost soul theme and so I gave him a heroine who possessed the ability save him even as he saves her. As you might be able to tell, I love telling a gritty story.

 

Is this book part of a series?  If so, should the books be read in order?

This book is part of a series but you do not have to read them in order. Each book is a standalone story that centers on a group of men who work for the Council~~a mission impossible group of men and women who does various nefarious work for the crown.

 

Describe the hero of Passion and Pleasure in London with 3 words.  The heroine?

Rory Jameson: Tall, dark & dangerous. (Both physically and metaphorically)

Winter Ashburn: Innocent, passionate & loyal

 

What is your favorite part of being a writer?  Least favorite?

My favorite part of being a writer is working on a book I love, the process of writing itself. It’s finding your groove in the story and letting the passion of the moment take you away to your character’s world. (In the old days if I had told anyone this they would have locked me away, I’m sure) J The worst part of being a writer, is spending too much of my time alone in the attic, or worrying about my numbers, or whether a particular story is working, if it is not working, why not? I have set a very high standard for myself and I want my books to be good.

 

Is there anything you would like to write, but haven’t? For example, any other genre you’d like to try?

If I ever switched genres, I would write a romantic suspense. But I love historical too much to switch and right now my career is moving along quite well.

 

Who has inspired you as a writer?

Other writers like Kathleen Woodiwiss, Penelope Williamson, and M.M Kaye. My love of reading gave me the desire and the courage to try my hand at writing. I struggled with the craft for many years before I finally found my RWA chapter in 1996. RWA changed my life.

 

What would you like to tell aspiring writers?

Join a writer’s group in RWA if possible. Attend the national conference. But more than anything, sit down and write the book. And always, always believe in yourself.

 

Describe yourself in 3 words.

Motivated, passionate & determined.

 

How do you like to relax?

Sleep or read a good book. J I have a very difficult time relaxing.

 

What do you like to read?

I read everything, non-fiction and fiction. One of the things I like so much about writing historical is the research. I have a huge library filled with books. I also discovered at a very young age that reading is so much more enjoyable than watching television or going to the movies. I find myself hitting my huge TBR piles at all hours day and night. One of the reasons I like attending the national RWA conference is for all the wonderful books I get there.

 

If you had a time capsule to be opened 50 years in the future, what would you put in it?

Oooo, good question. I guess I would have to think what I would want to find in a time capsule that someone left me fifty years ago. Since I love history, I would want to find an old magazines and newspapers. Something that was part of the era.

 

For me, since I will not be around in fifty years, I would be aiming this time capsule at my children, who would then be in their seventies and maybe great-grandparents, I would put in pictures of them with their father and I, a quilt made by my mother, my wedding dress which was a Victorian hoopskirt gown, LOL. Love letters I wrote to their father when he was deployed overseas, my wedding ring because it might be worth something in fifty years. J What with the price of gold these days. I’d put in my grandparents’ old coins that I still have around here someplace. In fifty years it might be like discovering a doubloon. J. I guess I would want my great, great-grandchildren to know a little something of my life and my world. Of course, I would include all of my books. They may be worth a college education for the paper alone by then. LOL.

 

What is next for you?

My next book out in July 2009, is called Beauty and the Duke and is a magical take on the Beauty and the Beast fairytale that takes place in an old castle in Scotland. Throw in a magic ring, a curse, and a paleontologist looking to find a dragon and you have my next historical series. J

 

Is there anything you’d like to ask readers?

I’d be interested in hearing what kind of hero is a favorite of theirs. What are some of their favorite historicals and why a particular author has touched a reader as she has. I am always interested in what readers have to say about the industry and what they would like to find on the shelves. Come visit my website and check out my new book at: www.melodythomas.com.

Thanks Melody for that wonderful interview.  Readers, look for my review of Passion and Pleasure in London here on the blog soon.
In the meantime, how about answering Melody’s questions for readers…

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13 Responses to Interview with Melody Thomas

  1. Fedora says:

    Hi, Melody! Thanks for the great interview! I’m glad to learn about your writing and will be looking for your books–your latest in particular sounds really intriguing. I do love stories where the heroine isn’t just a shrinking victim who needs saving 🙂

    As for favorite heroes, I prefer them tall, dark, and strongly principled (even when it might be more along their own code of honor–loners can very appealing). Some of my favorite historicals are Julia Quinn’s Bridgertons, Lisa Kleypas’s Wallflower Quartet, and Sylvia Day’s Georgians. I especially love how Quinn blends humor with her stories–I do love funny 🙂

  2. azteclady says:

    Welcome, Melody!

    Personally, I like characters–both male and female–that have depth. They can be dark and tortured, or centered and content, but either way they have to feel real.

    Best of luck with the new release!

  3. Quilt Lady says:

    Well Melody, I am a big historical buff. I love the heros like Rhett Butler, you just can’t beat them. I also like about all historical authors, so just bring on those historicals.

  4. Beth R says:

    I love a little mystery to the hero, I like a strong hero.
    I love ELizabeth Lowell’s historicals.

  5. Jane says:

    Hi Melody,
    Alpha heroes who are tall, dark and handsome are my favorite. They should have a great sense of humor, too. Some of my favorite historicals are by Julie Garwood, Julia Ross, Lisa Kleypas and Jacquie D’Alessandro.

  6. Helen says:

    Great interview Ladies I love your books Melody and have this one on order waiting for it to arrive can’t wait to get stuck into it.

    I love alpha men tall dark and bad at times some of my favourite books have been Claiming The Courtesan Anna Campbell I love Kathleen Woodiwiss’s books Stephanie Laurens to name a few.

    Have Fun
    Helen

  7. cheryl c. says:

    I enjoyed the interview. Passion and Pleasure in London sounds like a wonderful love story with characters to really care about. I also think the book cover is one of the prettiest I have seen!

  8. I love your responses. BethR mentioned Elizabeth Lowell’s heroes. I had forgotten, but I have every historical she has ever written. I love her heroes. They are alpha to the max, yet, wonderfully vulnerable when it comes to the heroine. A very vulnerable hero that I thought was well-drawn was also in Claiming the Courtesan by Anna Campbell.

  9. Cherl: I love this book cover. In my humble opinion, I believe this is my most beautiful cover yet. I don’t know if I am supposed to play favorites with my books. But there it is. I guess that makes me a bad mother. LOL

  10. Pam Pellini says:

    Hi Melody, definitely looking forward to the new one and that Beauty and the Beast story (paleontologist looking for a dragon, I like).

    Two of my now alltime favorite heros, and books – Jo Goodman’s If His Kiss is Wicked (Restell) and The Price of Desire (Griffin). They aren’t your usual rakes. Restell is more of a beta, appears to all as charming but aimless and carefree, but secretly takes on investigations to help others he deems in need by word of mouth. Griffin is a Viscount who owns a gaming hell, more the alpha, thought cold and dangerous, his aim to make a profit to restore his family estate and support his family, unknown to others. Both meet heroines who have been damaged by traumas, but are strong and independent and struggle to move on despite those inner personal turmoils. They are insightful to what those heroines need, want to help and protect them, yet admire their strenghths and determination despite those traumas as they learn more about them and don’t take charge – they watch, ready to step in if needed, but let their heroines make their own decisions, carefully putting forth their thoughts then leaving them to act on them as they will, protectively watching over and ready to step in only if needed. She weaves a wonderful tale of romance through their actions, the romance progressing slowly through the story, to be savored, not afraid to acknowledge their love sooner than she, patiently waiting for her (fearful of love and intimacy) to learn to trust (as they with their own past baggage have done), love and acknowledge it in return, without forcing her to.

  11. Pam Pellini says:

    Hi Melody, definitely looking forward to the new one and that Beauty and the Beast story (paleontologist looking for a dragon, I like).

    Two of my now alltime favorite heros, and books – Jo Goodman’s If His Kiss is Wicked (Restell) and The Price of Desire (Griffin). They aren’t your usual rakes. Restell is more of a beta, appears to all as charming but aimless and carefree, but secretly takes on investigations to help others he deems in need by word of mouth. Griffin is a Viscount who owns a gaming hell, more the alpha, thought cold and dangerous, his aim to make a profit to restore his family estate and support his family, unknown to others. Both meet heroines who have been damaged by traumas, but are strong and independent and struggle to move on despite those inner personal turmoils. They are insightful to what those heroines need, want to help and protect them, yet admire their strenghths and determination despite those traumas as they learn more about them and don’t take charge – they watch, ready to step in if needed, but let their heroines make their own decisions, carefully putting forth their thoughts then leaving them to act on them as they will, protectively watching over and ready to step in only if needed. She weaves a wonderful tale of romance through their actions, the romance progressing slowly through the story, to be savored, not afraid to acknowledge their love sooner than she, patiently waiting for her (fearful of love and intimacy) to learn to trust (as they with their own past baggage have done), love and acknowledge it in return, without forcing her to.

  12. Pam Pellini says:

    Hi Melody, definitely looking forward to the new one and that Beauty and the Beast story (paleontologist looking for a dragon, I like).

    Two of my now alltime favorite heros, and books – Jo Goodman’s If His Kiss is Wicked (Restell) and The Price of Desire (Griffin). They aren’t your usual rakes. Restell is more of a beta, appears to all as charming but aimless and carefree, but secretly takes on investigations to help others he deems in need by word of mouth. Griffin is a Viscount who owns a gaming hell, more the alpha, thought cold and dangerous, his aim to make a profit to restore his family estate and support his family, unknown to others. Both meet heroines who have been damaged by traumas, but are strong and independent and struggle to move on despite those inner personal turmoils. They are insightful to what those heroines need, want to help and protect them, yet admire their strenghths and determination despite those traumas as they learn more about them and don’t take charge – they watch, ready to step in if needed, but let their heroines make their own decisions, carefully putting forth their thoughts then leaving them to act on them as they will, protectively watching over and ready to step in only if needed. She weaves a wonderful tale of romance through their actions, the romance progressing slowly through the story, to be savored, not afraid to acknowledge their love sooner than she, patiently waiting for her (fearful of love and intimacy) to learn to trust (as they with their own past baggage have done), love and acknowledge it in return, without forcing her to.

  13. Hi Pam:

    Jo Goodman is one of my most favorite authors next to Penelope Willimason and Kathleen Woodiwiss. I really love the way Jo Goodman crafts her heroes and the stories she writes. The Compass Club series sits on my keeper shelf.

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